I learned to program...

QBasic at a summer computer camp.
— 
Adam Wong

with QBasic in middle school.
— 
Anders Hassis

to tweak the game Gorillas that came with QBasic in the x286 computer I got in middle school.
— 
Andrés Monroy-Hernández

using QBasic in high school and knew from day one that it's what I wanted to do with the rest of my life.
— 
Ben Nadel

because I wanted to know what this QBasic thing was that came bundled with Windows 3.11.
— 
Colin Waddell

so I could write a sequel to The Legend of Zelda in QBasic, at age 9.
— 
Drew Sears

at 10 years old, modifying "nibbles" (in QBasic) to display my name in the tail of the snake.
— 
Emiliano Romero

by writing QBasic and TI-85 programs to do my boring math homework for me.
— 
Emory Myers

reading the QBasic built-in help.
— 
Henrique Vilela

in QBasic because drawing in Microsoft Paint was so boring.
— 
Irving Morales

by using QBasic to play tones on the computer, which I then turned into music.
— 
Jaelle Scheuerman

using QBasic to make interesting visuals to show to friends.
— 
James Pine

by hacking QBasic games on my IBM 286.
— 
James Yu

in QBasic, trying to modify the Nibbles and Gorillas games.
— 
Jano González

in QBasic on an IBM AT using a tattered old book full of example programs in GW-BASIC.
— 
Joseph Near

using QBasic to write a subroutine to take integers like 2345 and convert them to strings like "two thousand three hundred forty-five".
— 
Kevin Morrill

using QBasic to write a prime number generator out of curiosity.
— 
Matt Walters

in QBasic because I wanted to be a hacker.
— 
Melita Mihaljević

by poking around GORILLAS.BAS and NIBBLES.BAS which came with QBasic.
— 
Miikka Koskinen

when my grandfather showed me the QBasic source to Gorillas.
— 
Oliver Wilkerson

by translating code from "Writing Adventure Games on the Amstrad CPC 464 / CPC 664" (a computer we never owned) to 386 QBasic.
— 
Paul Bohm

using QBasic to make a funny spinoff of tic-tac-toe, called Tic-Tac-Yo-Momma.
— 
Philip Kelly

trying to catch Bigfoot by editing the QBasic code in the back of a 3-2-1 Contact magazine.
— 
Seth Raphael

with an book on introductory programming in QBasic on a DOS machine.
— 
Titus Winters

with QBasic writing an Eliza clone, for fun, around 6th or 7th grade.
— 
Tommy