I learned to program...

At my Computer Club in 1975 as a Freshman in HS to solve SAS and SSS triangle problems using BASIC on a PDP 11/780 Minicomputer via a 300 baud modem!
— 
A. Jorge Garcia

in BASIC as part of a mandatory computer class at my Catholic grade school. Thank you, Mrs. Roy.
— 
Aaron Willette

throwing together MUD-style games in BASIC.
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Adam Stegman

QBasic at a summer computer camp.
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Adam Wong

using Visual Basic, for my Computing A-level in 2007.
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Alex Muller

in BASIC on an Amstrad 128 because I couldn't fathom how a computer could possibly do what it did.
— 
Alex Southgate

as a teenager, writing the Terminator 2 melody as tones in BASIC.
— 
Alexander Chen

after putting the kids I babysat to bed; I would make games in BASIC.
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Alexandra Holloway

by copying game code in BASIC that was printed in the back of magazines.
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Allen Murray

because I had believed that the television was a portal onto Sesame Street, and BASIC brought me back to that sense of a vast world inside the screen.
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Allin Kahrl

with QBasic in middle school.
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Anders Hassis

to tweak the game Gorillas that came with QBasic in the x286 computer I got in middle school.
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Andrés Monroy-Hernández

when I was 8, and my mom taught me BASIC on an Atari 800.
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Andrea Forte

when I was 7 years old, from BASIC books my father gave me which had entire games printed out line by line.
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Andrew Traviss

in BASIC written down on grid paper, because at first none of the computers I had access to came with a programming environment.
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Andrew Witte

on a toy from 1986 called the Basic Tutor, with a BASIC interpreter and 2KB RAM.
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Andy West

without realizing I was coding when I designed an animated card in BASIC for my mom for her birthday.
— 
Anne Sullivan

BASIC with a pen and paper and later typed in when I could find a computer.
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Anoop Sankar

in 1984, using BASIC on an Atari 800XL. Funny.
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Antonio Pintus

by taking a course in BASIC at my high school.
— 
Art Simon

using QBasic in high school and knew from day one that it's what I wanted to do with the rest of my life.
— 
Ben Nadel

in the car with BASIC on my mom's laptop because I forgot a book to read.
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Ben Norskov

in BASIC on the KC85/3 when I was 8.
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Bjoern Doebel

in BASIC on an Apple II+ that my dad won in a raffle he forgot he had entered.
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Brian Cavalier

writing QBert clone on Sega 3000, saving BASIC lines on tape recorder.
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Bruce Lane

from my big sister who taught me BASIC on my Atari 800XL.
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Carl Tracy

in BASIC as a way to learn my times tables and it just got more complex from there.
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Chris Klosowski

by copying simple games in BASIC from a book into my dad's Timex/Sinclair 1000.
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Christiaan Adams

because when my grandpa showed me simple BASIC code I saw a game where you could write all the rules.
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Christine Task

because I wanted to know what this QBasic thing was that came bundled with Windows 3.11.
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Colin Waddell

entering code from Atari BASIC magazines, and making changes to see how things worked (on an Atari 400 computer).
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Dave Yang

because I was deaf when I was 5, and my Dad taught me how to talk to computers with BASIC.
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David Byard

by reading books on writing games in BASIC at the library.
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David Glasser

calendar apps in 1K of Sinclair BASIC on a ZX81 plugged into a black-and-white telly.
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David Jones

in BASIC on a TRS-80 model 1, pouring over code from TAB books on AI and articles in Byte magazine.
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David Skinner

using the BASIC interpreter on a TI99/4A.
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Dean Christakos

hacking BASIC on a Commodore VIC-20, to create interactive narrative — bouncing balls were way too mathy.
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Derek Reilly

by reading the ITT BASIC manual with my Mom after school during 3rd grade.
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Dr. Bo Brinkman

so I could write a sequel to The Legend of Zelda in QBasic, at age 9.
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Drew Sears

at 10 years old, modifying "nibbles" (in QBasic) to display my name in the tail of the snake.
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Emiliano Romero

by writing QBasic and TI-85 programs to do my boring math homework for me.
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Emory Myers

by copy-pasting code out of a BASIC user manual into an old 386 machine until it did what I wanted it to do.
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Eric Mann

writing BASIC games on the Apple IIe; you could buy games, but it was more fun entering line by line yourself.
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Erik Natzke

when I poked my nose into my father's book for learning how to write programs using BASIC.
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Fadoua Ghourabi

because there was a BASIC program in the back of my 8th grade biology book and I wanted to understand it.
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Florencia Mincucci

by copying BASIC code for a simple guessing game from a teen magazine and adapting it later.
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Franziska Sauerwein

when my dad told me I could make the computer play me a melody using BASIC.
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Helen Hou-Sandi

reading the QBasic built-in help.
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Henrique Vilela

by playing with Microsoft QuickBASIC on a Macintosh Classic when I was 8.
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Huw Rowlands

in BASIC, an hour before bedtime each night on my father's machine.
— 
Ian Fitzpatrick

in QBasic because drawing in Microsoft Paint was so boring.
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Irving Morales

making the most basic of games on my TI-83 calculator that we used in high-school.
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Jaaq Jorissen

by using QBasic to play tones on the computer, which I then turned into music.
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Jaelle Scheuerman

using QBasic to make interesting visuals to show to friends.
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James Pine

by hacking QBasic games on my IBM 286.
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James Yu

on a Commodore VIC-20, writing a BASIC program to make the TV screen cycle through a bunch of different colors.
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Jane Wells

in QBasic, trying to modify the Nibbles and Gorillas games.
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Jano González

nominally in BASIC, but actually for my Tamagotchi website '97-'98.
— 
Jean Yang

to write my own video games in BASIC on a TI-99.
— 
Jeff Burdges

BASIC. On the Atari 800. Good times!
— 
Jeff Chasin

teaching myself BASIC from a book on my Dad's TRS-80 Model III, then later hacking on dial-up BBS systems.
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Jeffrey Wescott

when I was 14 (1993) using MS Visual Basic 3.0 and MS Access.
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John James Jacoby

because my parents wouldn't let us play video games; I learned BASIC and wrote one.
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Jonathan Dugan

reading books of games in BASIC, and later to control a robot with ANN.
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Jorge E. Cardona

in QBasic on an IBM AT using a tattered old book full of example programs in GW-BASIC.
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Joseph Near

by interrupting math games written in BASIC and messing up all the angles to mess with the teachers mental state.
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Joseph Wilk

in tenth grade, by creating a piano lesson in HyperCard, then moving to BASIC when I realized I could build tools and games instead of just using them.
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Kaleigh Smith

by typing in the BASIC games from the back of 3-2-1 Contact Magazine with my nerdy friends.
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Kasima Tharnpipitchai

by typing in BASIC programs from a magazine with my mum.
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Kate Farrell

in a one-semester BASIC class (with a teletype!) during my sophomore year of high school.
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Kathy Walrath

by taking apart old text-adventure games written in BASIC.
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Kelly Heffner Wilkerson

in 1981 while stationed as a private at Ft. Stewart, Georgia; weekends spent studying BASIC on an old TRS-80 in a small room in the base library.
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Kelvin Meeks

using QBasic to write a subroutine to take integers like 2345 and convert them to strings like "two thousand three hundred forty-five".
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Kevin Morrill

because my mom wanted to keep me busy while she held office hours, so together we coded 20 questions and tic tac toe in BASIC.
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Kristi Potter

on an old programmable calculator using BASIC.
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Lea Kissner

in BASIC on the C64 to give my mother a question-response program for mother's day; it talked back to her and explained the many ways in which she is awesome.
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Lodewijk Gonggrijp

in BASIC on an old Texas Instruments computer, when I was 9 years old. I've never been afraid of code.
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Lori Compas

by treating Sinclar BASIC as a word processor, until I figured out what to type to make it stop beeping.
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Luke Hutton

in 6th grade, when I coded up an ugly animated fish in BASIC; it was awesome.
— 
Maayan Roth

by reading a BASIC book, writing code on paper at night, and driving to my friend (who had a C64) the next morning.
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Manuel Kiessling

by typing in BASIC example code on a Casio PB-100 programmable calculator.
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Mario Klingemann

by building games in Visual Basic by moving Windows forms elements.
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Martin Evans

by writing a BASIC game on a manual typewriter, and being driven by my mom to the local Radio Shack where I typed it in to the TRS-80 I coveted.
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Matt Hillman

using QBasic to write a prime number generator out of curiosity.
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Matt Walters

by accident when I received a Coleco Adam "Programming in BASIC" manual instead of a video game system manual.
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Maxwell Spangler

in QBasic because I wanted to be a hacker.
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Melita Mihaljević

by typing BASIC program listings from a children's magazine into my Atari 800XL.
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Michael Ferraro

BASIC on a Commodore 16, using my parents' huge console TV as a monitor.
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Michelle Vietor

by poking around GORILLAS.BAS and NIBBLES.BAS which came with QBasic.
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Miikka Koskinen

when I was 10, and dad bought the Oric Atmos which ran BASIC; it was insanely awesome.
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Muhammad Nasrullah

in grad school with Visual Basic after my first mid-life crisis — I earned the only A in that class.
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Nicole Coyne

on an Atari ST by reading the Omikron Basic manual during my summer holidays.
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Nikolaus Gradwohl

when my grandfather showed me the QBasic source to Gorillas.
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Oliver Wilkerson

on a Commodore 64 by reading a book with a BASIC game in it and typing in that game (about 5000 lines of code).
— 
Otto

in BBC Basic as a teenager, just for fun.
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Owen Stephens

in 8th Grade on a Sharp PC 1403 (a calculator with a BASIC interpretor); coded so much that year I had to repeat the grade.
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Ozh Richard

on a Sharp PC-E500 about two decades ago; my little 7-year-old heart shattered when my BASIC program caused permanent damage, killing the device.
— 
Paolo Rodriguez

by translating code from "Writing Adventure Games on the Amstrad CPC 464 / CPC 664" (a computer we never owned) to 386 QBasic.
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Paul Bohm

because my HS teacher challenged me to do a calculator in Visual Basic.
— 
Paula

by writing BASIC games on my TI-73 calculator.
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Peter Coolen

using QBasic to make a funny spinoff of tic-tac-toe, called Tic-Tac-Yo-Momma.
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Philip Kelly

in BASIC when my mother taught me an IF, a FOR, and a GOTO.
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Rachel Chermside

because the "Learn BASIC" program was on a diskette with games and I accidentally started it, not knowing it was real stuff.
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Ran Biron

because MSX only had a BASIC interpreter when turned on without a cartridge and the only cartridge I had was River Raid.
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Ricardo Herrmann

by reading all the public library books about BASIC during 1986-7, before I had ever seen a real computer.
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Ricky Buchanan

because a wise Radio Shack employee talked mom into buying me BASIC books instead of a game cartridge for my TRS-80.
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Rob Vincent

from a school class in BASIC, but didn't really learn how to write computer programs until I studied LISP almost twenty years later.
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Samuel Wan

trying to catch Bigfoot by editing the QBasic code in the back of a 3-2-1 Contact magazine.
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Seth Raphael

from my mother, who built computers and write BASIC; and a Commodore 64 she bought for me at the age of 7.
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Shelly Cole

using ZX-80 BASIC and the Sinclair 1K ZX-81, quickly moving on to the 16K version; they cramped my programming style but it was fun.
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Sue Gee

with an book on introductory programming in QBasic on a DOS machine.
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Titus Winters

on an Atari 400 using BASIC in the early 80's because I wanted to output my own graphics to the TV.
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Tom Jenkins

with QBasic writing an Eliza clone, for fun, around 6th or 7th grade.
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Tommy

using a BASIC book I got from Radio Shack and translating the TRS-80 commands into the AppleSoft version of BASIC.
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Toni Thompson

by playing with my TI-83's BASIC instead of listening to lectures in high school.
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Trevor Standley

using BASIC on a Windows 3.0, because it was easier to let the program solve my math questions.
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Trisha Biswas

when I was 10, by using BASIC on the TK-85 (Brazilian ZX81 clone) my dad had bought for no apparent reason.
— 
Zeh Fernando